Zoo peacocks on the loose since May 5

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By BOB UPHUES

Two peacocks that escaped from Brookfield Zoo last Thursday are apparently in no hurry to get back.

After being spotted in the Hollywood section of Brookfield on May 5 and in Riverside's First Division on May 6, the pair of female peacocks have now apparently made their way into North Riverside, where they were spotted Monday night.

"The peacocks were visiting North Riverside Park Mall last night," Nikki Epstein, an employee in the management office of the mall wrote in an email to the Landmark on Tuesday morning. "They were hanging out at loading dock G."

Mall employees reportedly notified the zoo of the sighting.

Cathy Haley, assistant to Riverside's village manager, said a woman called her at about 2 p.m. on May 6 to report she saw two peacocks in front of 223 Bloomingbank Road, heading east.

At least one of the peacocks had a band around its ankle, verified by photos taken of the peacocks, meaning they were part of Brookfield Zoo's collection. The zoo has six male peacocks and nine females in its collection.

Sondra Katzen, a spokeswoman for the zoo, said peacocks were also reportedly seen May 5 near the Hollywood Metra stop in Brookfield. The peacocks may have walked east down the railroad tracks to reach Riverside's First Division.

Carol Casey, who lives in the 3600 block of Hollywood Avenue in Brookfield, said that two peacocks, both apparently female, showed up in her backyard mid-afternoon on May 5 and spent the entire night high up in a tree in her backyard.

"They were not colorful, so they were probably females," Casey said.

The peacocks were there the next morning but were gone by 9:30 a.m.

"It has occasionally happened before," said Katzen of the peacocks getting outside the zoo's gates. "They do come back because the feeding area here brings them back."

She also said that peacocks are pretty savvy about avoiding predators. They can fly and have been known to roost in trees, she said. It's unclear, however, whether itinerant peacocks have left the zoo grounds for so long or have traveled so far away.

-Bob Uphues

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Terri O'Casey  

Posted: June 13th, 2019 9:09 PM

Does not the Zoo have an obligation to send out staff to humanely capture the peacocks and return to the grounds of the Zoo? It seems to be an unsafe situation that they are in. As a long time member of BZ I would hope so.

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